Category Archives: Adult Mental Health

Coping During the Holidays

Posted November 25, 2020

When the Holidays Aren’t Merry

For many people, the holiday season is a happy time to reunite with family and celebrate one year’s ending and the beginning of a new one. However, this time of year may not be full of good cheer for many. If you are experiencing grief, the loss of a relationship, loneliness, illness, or if you don’t have a family to celebrate with, these months may be something you dread. Even if you have plenty to celebrate and loved ones to celebrate with, you may still feel overcome by the busy schedules, shopping lists, and the world’s daily news. If you or someone close to you have a mental health condition such as depression or anxiety, you may find those difficulties magnified during the holidays. Continue reading

Coping as a Family With Mental Illness

Posted September 9, 2020

When someone in your family struggles with mental illness, you may feel helpless and not know what to say. Many people don’t know how to help or where to go to find competent professional care. Because every person’s experience with mental illness is different, there is no one size fits all plan of care. The way you approach the situation depends on the circumstances. However, here are a few tips that may help you approach your loved one in a caring and compassionate way that lets them know you only want to help. Continue reading

Updated Mental Health Systems Diversity Statement

Posted July 22, 2020

To Our Community,

The team at MHS has spent the past several weeks in personal and professional reflection as we have struggled with the events in our community throughout the months of May and June.  Out of this reflection, we remind ourselves that we support our community and are proud to serve it.  We write this to reaffirm our commitment to our community – to our unwavering support of the BIPOC, LGBTQIA, and other underserved and marginalized individuals and communities.

At MHS we are committed to our ongoing growth and learning – as an agency and as individual members of the team.

And we can do better. Continue reading

Emotional Regulation Skills and Stability

Posted May 1, 2020

Emotional Regulation Skills and Stability

Every human emotion has a purpose. Some bring pleasure, others keep people safe, and still, others allow sadness and mourning. Emotions are a normal and healthy part of life. However, people must be able to understand, interpret, and regulate emotions to maintain healthy functioning. One person’s emotions can affect the feelings of those around them as well.

When trauma or mental health problems interfere with the ability to regulate emotions, therapy can help. DBT may be an effective form of treatment, as it focuses on acknowledging feelings as neither good or bad and managing reactions to them. DBT involves one-on-one sessions with a trained therapist and group sessions.

Continue reading

DBT and Borderline Personality Disorder

Posted March 12, 2020

 

What Is Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD)?

Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is a mental health diagnosis that involves difficulty regulating emotions. When someone with BPD experiences intense stress over an extended period, it can be tough for that person to de-escalate to a “normal” level of functioning. This feeling may express itself as self-harm, unhealthy relationships, and impulsivity. Individuals diagnosed with BPD are 75% female, though professionals suspect that men are often misdiagnosed.

What Are the Symptoms of Borderline Personality Disorder?

Characteristics of borderline personality disorder vary by the individual, but some are more usual than others, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM). Here are some of the most common symptoms of BPD: Continue reading

Super-users in Health Care. MHS’ Dr. Mark Carlson Leads Training on Clients with Chronic Conditions

Posted March 3, 2020
Did you know that 5% of the general population accounts for about 50% of health care costs?  Coined super-users, these clients struggle to engage, burn out providers, and often have poor outcomes.  For many of these clients, traditional therapy techniques are either ineffective, or make the situation worse.  “Therapists and health care providers often haven’t seen the research and don’t know the strategies that work with these clients”, says Dr. Mark Carlson, who has spoken nationally on super-users.  “Fortunately, there are clear strategies that work across approaches that help engage clients, improve outcomes, and lead to therapists and care providers feeling better about their work with high need clients”, Dr. Carlson continued.
Held on March 6th, click here for more information and to register for this event.

Parasympathetic Nervous System and Trauma

Posted March 2, 2020

What Is the Parasympathetic Nervous System?

The parasympathetic nervous system (PSNS), sometimes called the feed-and-breed or rest-and-digest system, is part of the autonomic nervous system, along with the sympathetic nervous system. Located between the brain and spinal cord, the PSNS is tasked with saving the body’s energy by slowing the heart rate and increasing the activity of the intestines and glands during periods of rest. It also relaxes the sphincter muscles in the gastrointestinal system.

Here are some of the body functions stimulated through the parasympathetic nervous system. The PSNS uses acetylcholine as its primary neurotransmitter, but other peptides may act on the PSNS as well. Continue reading

Help A Loved One; Look Out For These Signs of Suicidal Behavior

Posted April 12, 2019

Suicide is a traumatic experience for an entire community. As there is a diverse range of signs, symptoms, and causes, understanding the many signs can help you reach out to a loved one. If you are concerned that someone you know may be having suicidal thoughts, learn to spot common warning signs and how adult DBT can help them deal with their thoughts, feelings, and actions.

Changes in Mood

While no single sign can completely predict attempted suicide, many individuals who are considering show mood changes:

  • Anxiety
  • Shame/humiliation
  • Depression
  • Irritability
  • Anger/agitation
  • Sudden calmness

Continue reading