Tips for Staging an Intervention

Posted January 29, 2021

 

An intervention is a process in which the family and friends of someone struggling with an addiction work with a professional to help them see the consequences. It may involve members of the faith community, a doctor, a therapist, and other people who love the addicted person, in addition to the family. While most people think of interventions concerning recovery from alcoholism or drug abuse, either prescription or illegal. However, this form of group intervention can also help families dealing with a loved one with compulsive behaviors such as gambling, pornography, and eating disorders. Family interventions can be an essential first step to recovery from addiction. Continue reading

Overcoming the Stigma of Mental Health

Posted January 15, 2021

What Is the Stigma of Mental Illness?

The word “stigma” comes from the Latin word meaning brand or mark. It refers to some identifying feature of the bearer of the mark, generally one that signifies something unsatisfactory or negative. Historically, tradition indicated that the person bearing a stigma did something wrong or evil to be cursed with the mark. Continue reading

Realistic New Year’s Resolutions for Those Dealing with Depression

Posted January 6, 2021

Make Mental Health A Priority in Your Resolutions

As one year ends and a new one begins, our thoughts turn to what we’d like to do with the blank slate before us. While many people look forward with excitement, for the estimated 350 million people struggling with different types of depression, it can be a time of frustration, sadness, and disappointment. Realistic goals can be great motivators, but when you set unattainable targets for yourself, the result may be feelings of failure and an even deeper state of depression. Here are some tips for avoiding this situation as you’re welcoming in the new year. Continue reading

How Does CBT Work?

Posted January 6, 2021

What is Cognitive Behavioral Therapy?

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an evidence-based form of psychotherapy that focuses on changing how a client thinks and behaves from negative to more positive. Used alone or in conjunction with other therapies, CBT can help address many issues, including insomnia, anxiety, phobias, trauma, and relationship problems such as poor communication. CBT’s premise is that the problems we face in our day to day lives result from our flawed thought patterns and behaviors. Continue reading