Learning from Setbacks

Posted November 28, 2017

All clients recovering from addiction face setbacks.  While demoralizing, these lapses provide important lessons that inform sustained recovery in the future.  To help clients apply these lessons, use this FREE Handout and Worksheet from Dr. Lane Pederson’s book DBT in Integrated Dual Disorder Treatment Settings.

Asking for Help With Pain

Posted November 21, 2017

It can be challenging for individuals with chronic conditions to find the balance when asking for help. Many people have experienced barriers with everyday household activities and responsibilities as well as occasions of cancelling plans due to pain. It is common for individuals to feel like they will upset their support system by asking for help.  This leads many people to keep their needs to themselves. It can be easy to think that other people will automatically know what you need, and frustrations can result when they don’t get it.

Even though it may feel this way, keep in mind that we don’t know what other people are thinking.  Other people cannot read your mind to know what you need. It is appropriate to ask for help, and doing so builds self-respect. Use this idea as motivation to prepare and reach out

  • Start by identifying your different support needs. This includes emotional and physical needs.
  • The clearer and more specific you are, the better.
  • Communicate with your supports ahead of time. Ask them what kind of help they are willing to offer. For some, it may be help with chores like carrying laundry. For others, it may be help with getting to appointments or providing emotional support during challenging times.
  • Make sure to reinforce others for jumping in.

It may feel challenging in the moment to follow up and ask for help. Remember that your supports have shared with you what they feel comfortable with, and to trust their word and intention with what they offered. Use mindfulness to work on balancing the acceptance of help from others with the things you can do independently to enhance your quality of life.

Emotions, Thoughts, and Situations That Trigger Addictive Behavior

Posted November 9, 2017

It can be challenging to identify and manage what triggers addictive behaviors. Understanding what sets off these behaviors and knowing which strategies and solutions for change are effective are essential in one’s recovery.

Enjoy this free handout on Emotions, Thoughts, and Situations That Trigger Addictive Behavior taken from Dr. Lane Pederson’s book The Expanded Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills Training Manual.


Being Your Own Care Advocate

Posted November 6, 2017

Don’t get lost in the shuffle.
When you have chronic pain and mental illness, it is easy to feel like your sense of self gets lost in the shuffle. Between all the appointments, lists of diagnoses, and varying treatment opinions, it is common to feel overwhelmed as you wonder how to become your own care advocate. Pair this with limited appointment availability and you have a recipe for reduced advocacy as you feel unheard and shut down.  It may also lead to treatment burn out and turning to your providers as the directors for your treatment.

You are the expert!
It is true that your providers may be the experts in certain assessments and interventions. This does not mean that they are the experts in your day-to-day experience. Keep in mind that you are not only the consumer and advocate for your care, but also the expert in your daily life. YOU are the one who lives in your body and the only one who knows how this truly feels. You are your own advocate. Hold on to this idea so it empowers you to ask for help as you advocate and direct your care. If something doesn’t feel right, speak up. Ask questions. The goal is to advocate and collaborate with your team—you as the expert in your life meeting with the provider in the middle, to develop the best plan for you based on your experiences, goals, and values.

Thrive for Mental Health and Chronic Pain Management Care Advocate

 

Written by:
Morgan Cusack, PsyD
Program Coordinator of Thrive for Mental Health and Chronic Pain Management at MHS