Preparing for a Provider Appointment

Posted October 23, 2017

It can be sometimes feel daunting to get all of your goals met during your provider appointment. Between your questions and goals, the treatment planning of the provider, and limited appointment length it can feel like there isn’t enough time to get everything accomplished. This can be frustrating and disheartening for individuals who experience chronic pain and medical conditions. To avoid feeling shut down during your appointments, it is important to take active steps in preparing for these meetings. This planning can help to build confidence and sense of control, in addition to working towards efficiently meeting your goals.

Prior to your appointment, take some time to plan ahead. Write down your list of questions and goals. Gather any medical history, medication lists, and any symptom tracking details you have been collecting. It can be helpful to store these details in a folder or binder. Plan out your transportation, and make sure to allow for plenty of time for unexpected traffic or road construction. Will there be parking on or off site? What is the schedule or call ahead policy for scheduling transportation? When you arrive at your appointment, ask your provider to establish the timeline, and share the tools you have gathered and your top priority goals for that meeting. Bring a notepad and pen, and make sure to write down any questions or next steps recommended by your provider. These tips can allow you to not only increase your experience of feeling heard during the appointment, but can also increase your ability to understand the treatment and to follow through effectively afterwards.

Written by:
Morgan Cusack, PsyD
Program Coordinator of Thrive for Mental Health and Chronic Pain Management at MHS

5 Things to Think About When Working With Integrated Dual Disorder Clients

Posted October 19, 2017
  1. A basic truth of behavioral health interventions is that no two clients are alike.
    It is important to remember this as we do our work and it is especially vital to keep in mind with the complication of two significant behavioral disorders. How a client’s chemical health and mental health issues interact, impact daily functioning, affect willingness and even abilities to participate in therapy, is a very individual thing.
  2. Another basic truth is that for all clients, ‘perception is reality.’
    This is important in IDD treatment since mental health symptoms and chemical use (and the effects of long-term use) have real consequences for how a client might perceive their world.
  3. A harsh truth of therapy is that change is difficult, time consuming, and at times, difficult to notice.
    For IDD clients, there can be a significantly higher degree of difficulty paired with a lower level of skills. This can make the process even harder, longer, and more difficult to experience a sense of success.
  4. Acceptance and support are key additive factors to success in therapy.
    IDD clients tend to have heavily damaged, if not absent, systems of support and acceptance.
    There is a drive from payers to identify the primary diagnosis as the target for treatment.
  5. IDD clients have two significant primary diagnoses in all cases, and the majority have significant issues across what used to be the five axis’ of diagnosis. We have to attend to all significant issues.
    ~Steven Girardeau, PsyD, LP, Director of Clinical Services at MHS